Basic White Bread

by Merissa on February 4, 2011

in Recipes

Post image for Basic White Bread


I'm normally a wheat bread kind of girl but for some reason or another this sounded good the other day. So I whipped up a batch of simple white bread.

Are you enjoying what you see here?
Get new articles sent right to your inbox!
Sign up for our weekly newsletters for new articles sent right to your inbox plus get a free copy of my ebook, The Canner's Cookbook, just for signing up! We will never spam your inbox or send more than one email each week.

What you need:

  • 1/2 c. warm water
  • 1 1/2 T yeast
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1/3 c. oil
  • 1/6 c. sugar
  • 2 t. salt
  • 1 1/4 c. cold water
  • 3 c. flour
  • 3 -4 c. flour

In a small bowl mix the 1/2 c. warm water, yeast, and 1 T. sugar. Let it sit for 5 minutes or so.

In a mixer or in another bowl mix the boiling water, oil, sugar, and salt. Stir until it dissolves.

Add in the cold water and mix and then add in the yeast mixture. (You want the mixture temp to be lukewarm before you add the yeast and thats why do you do this.)

Add in 3 cups of flour and stir. Let this mixture rise for 30 minutes.

This is after 30 minutes. We have some nice bubbling yeast action going on here. :)

Add in the rest of the flour. It should form a nice not sticky dough. Let this rest for about 30 minutes.

Form into loaves and stick in a loaf pan. Let these rise for about an hour in a warm covered place. Or at least until doubled in size. Then bake them at 350F for 35-40 minutes.

whitebread2

Remove the loaves from the oven(this will make 2 loaves) and brush the tops with butter.


Print Friendly

Disclaimer: This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.


{ 64 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Penny Bills February 4, 2011 at 12:12 pm

Wow!! That looks so Yummy!! I bet that it tasted good and smelled so good too!! Just wanted you to know that you are an inspiration to me! Thank You so much!! Really enjoy your posts!!

Reply

2 Susan Fullerton March 3, 2011 at 2:49 pm

I have failed many times making bread, but I’m going to try again. Somehow you make everything seem do-able! Thanks for helping us along.

Reply

3 Merissa March 3, 2011 at 2:54 pm

I’ll share a little story with you… When I was 8 years old I joined a 4-H Club and signed up to do breadmaking in the fair. I made my little loaf of quick bread and took it to show the judge. It was my first fair and I was so nervous. The judge was so… judgmental…she didn’t tell me I did anything right and just focused on what I did wrong. So the next year I decided to try again. I made my bread the night before the fair, when I went to take it out of the oven it looked like soup. I had forgotten to add any rising agents. I was up so late that night making another batch of bread. After that year I stopped entering bread in the fair but I kept working on it and working on it. So yes, it took me that long to get breadmaking down! I always loved baking every since I was little but breadbaking was hard for me! It just took alot of time and alot of practice. :)

Reply

4 MJ October 4, 2013 at 12:19 pm

With yeast bread, failure is not uncommon. I buy yeast in bulk and keep it in the freezer so that it stays active for a very long period Two things to be aware of to make sure you get a good rise:
1. The temperature that yeast is exposed to prior to baking should be between 105 and 120 degrees F and NO HIGHER. The breakdown is as follows:
– the liquid should be between 105 to 110 if yeast is being added directly to the liquid OR
– the liquid should be from 115 to 120 if the yeast is mixed with dry ingredients before the liquid is added
2. Test that your yeast is active before committing all those ingredients to the recipe. I test yeast by putting a 1/4 tsp in a tablespoon of water then adding just a pinch of sugar. If it gets bubbly and foamy, you’ve got active yeast.
Good luck and don’t give up!

Reply

5 Maggie March 4, 2011 at 9:55 am

If you have a hard time getting dough to rise (especially in our cold, dry climate!) here is a tip that has always worked great for me – heat the oven to 200 degrees, then *Turn Off.* Boil a pot of water on the stove and stick it on the lowest rack of the oven. Put the dough on the rack above the boiling water. Close the oven and voila! This has never failed to get dough to rise for me! (I read it on the back of those frozen dough biscuits you can buy at Family Thrift!)

Reply

6 Sue Hamilton March 5, 2011 at 8:37 pm

Hi,
I l ove your website , you are teaching me so much and love going back to the way things used to be. I would like to ask one thing please, I wish you could make it where we can print the receipe without the pictures. It just uses so much ink and paper..please help..and thank you..I really look forward to you in my emal.

Suz

Reply

7 Merissa March 5, 2011 at 8:44 pm

Suz, when you click the Print Friendly button on the bottom of the post to print the recipe, there is a little box that you can check on the top of the pop up box that says “No Images” once you click that it will take away all the images and you will be able to just print the recipe. I hope that helps!

Reply

8 Alicia Webster July 24, 2011 at 4:13 pm

I have never tried making my own bread, but you make it seem almost easy, so I am going to give it a try. Two questions: Do you have to have a mixer or can you mix it by hand as well ? Also, if you bake the bread before the dough has risen, what happens? What is the purpose of having the dough rise first?

Reply

9 Merissa July 24, 2011 at 4:16 pm

You don’t have to have a mixer but you will need to knead it well before you let it rise. Bread has to rise to let the yeast work, when it rises properly you will have the nice fluffy airy bread that you think of when you think bread, otherwise it will just be a hard flat loaf. Have fun!

Reply

10 Alicia Webster July 24, 2011 at 7:32 pm

Thanks!

Reply

11 Dameon September 20, 2011 at 4:54 pm

Just about to pop my bread in the oven. I always thought making bread was scary hard… Definitely not thanks!

Reply

12 Monica V October 23, 2011 at 4:43 pm

I just wanted to say thank you for posting this recipe. My family loves it. Also the Chocolate chip bagels are great. As far as the bread goes, I have stopped buying bread from the store and I make this one. We go through 4 loaves a week. THANK YOU! I can now say I make good bread.

Reply

13 MaryBeth November 3, 2011 at 9:45 am

Hi Merissa! This is a really interesting site. I managed to ‘stumble’ across it, while looking for ways to save and such. Anyway, as I was reading this fantastic receipe, I just wanted to double check your amounts. I’ve been baking a variety of different types of bread from scratch lately and most of those receipes only require a teaspoon of yeast and an equal amount of sugar. The capital “T” in baking generally stands for Tablespoon, which sounds like an awful lot of yeast, and sugar, even for two loaves. Are you sure you don’t mean teaspoon for both the yeast and sugar? The receipes that I’ve been using, from King Arthur Flour and Red Star Yeast, only call for a teaspoon of yeast and/or sugar even for their larger receipes – This also saves on ingredents – I’ve been able to make 3 bread receipes from just one small packet of yeast (which contains 2 1/4 tsp. of yeast). I now buy my yeast in bulk (one pound cake) and store it in the fridge. I easily make at least one to two loaves a day for my family (and everyone loves it so much better than store bought) that I go through enough yeast to make that cost effective for me. But I just wondered on the amounts you listed for your bread here. Thanks for all your tips! Can’t wait to check out the whole site.

Reply

14 Merissa November 3, 2011 at 9:51 am

Hi MaryBeth and welcome! I double checked my recipe and the amounts of 1 T of yeast and 1 T of sugar is correct to make 2 loaves for this recipe.

Reply

15 amanda December 29, 2011 at 6:17 am

Can u let this dough rise in your bread machine . On the dough cycle.

Reply

16 Merissa December 29, 2011 at 11:34 am

You could try it!

Reply

17 Heather Jolley Bridenstine January 12, 2012 at 8:43 am

Strawberry Lemon Muffins! They were AMAZING!!

Reply

18 VickiRae Lopez January 12, 2012 at 8:44 am

Instead of two loaves do you know if this would make one big long loaf? I have the long commercial bread pan.

Reply

19 Kristal Robinson Edwards January 12, 2012 at 8:47 am

3 dozen yeast rolls. A cake, maybe brownies……

Reply

20 Mel Free January 12, 2012 at 8:47 am

I made this & the 2 loaves that it made were delicious!..They were HUGE loves!..not the kind you get in the store!..I would say 1 1/2 lb. loaves..each..I don’t know why you couldn’t make it in a commercial bread pan?..Thanks for the recipe, Merissa..I had no problem with making them..am going to make some more! :)

Reply

21 Anne Chiarelli January 12, 2012 at 8:51 am

I’m making baked apples as a nice chilly day snack.

Reply

22 Little House on the Prairie Living January 12, 2012 at 8:52 am

You could try a commercial bread pan but Mel is right, they are huge loaves! With the double batch I plan on making 2 loaves and then a tray with sub sandwich buns.

Reply

23 VickiRae Lopez January 12, 2012 at 8:54 am

Thank you, do you know if the dough can be made in a breadmaker or is too much for a 2lb. breadmaker?

Reply

24 Dawn Ulmer Thacker January 12, 2012 at 8:56 am

Gluten free rolls.

Reply

25 Julie Bertsch January 12, 2012 at 8:57 am

I just made a batch of whole white wheat biscuits. They are delicious. We are having biscuits and (homemade) sausage for lunch today…but the kids and I all had to sample a biscuit fresh from the oven for breakfast, too!

Reply

26 Little House on the Prairie Living January 12, 2012 at 8:58 am

It’s too much. If you are looking for one that will fit in the bread machine well I’d do this one: http://www.littlehouseliving.com/breadmaker-bread-mix.html

Reply

27 Letia Arrington Johnson January 12, 2012 at 9:00 am

Do you have a wheat post or what would be the adjustment for wheat?

Reply

28 Jenna Burns January 12, 2012 at 9:01 am

I made a chocolate cookie with a peppermint frosting, banana bread and then I made Alton Brown’s mayo. I love his recipe for it!

Reply

29 Little House on the Prairie Living January 12, 2012 at 9:01 am

Letia, I haven’t made that recipe full wheat but I have substituted half wheat and half white and it was very good!

Reply

30 Letia Arrington Johnson January 12, 2012 at 9:02 am

Well don’t you usually use some white in wheat recipes?

Reply

31 Jenna Burns January 12, 2012 at 9:03 am

Betty Crocker has a good wheat and white bread machine recipe.

Reply

32 Michelle Marty Kane January 12, 2012 at 9:09 am

I’m cooking a turkey! I love doing turkeys year round – which provides delicious ‘real’ meat (aka ‘lunch meat’) for sandwiches, yummy and fast dinner options, jars of turkey soup and gallons of turkey stock. And the house smells sooooo good!

Reply

33 Dawn Begin January 12, 2012 at 10:03 am

lol i made bread last night :)

Reply

34 Sherry Gibbs Atanasoff January 12, 2012 at 2:59 pm

We’re having a women’s night out at our church tonight. I was thinking about my bread machine, now I’ll have to use it to make something!

Reply

35 Susan O'Connor Fullerton January 12, 2012 at 4:39 pm

I baked a yellow cake last night, and will be baking again Saturday.

Reply

36 Sadie @allnaturalme November 24, 2012 at 8:08 am

Making!!!

Reply

37 sara cochran January 5, 2013 at 7:39 am

The recipe doesnt say anything about kneading. Does it not need to be kneaded?

Reply

38 Merissa January 5, 2013 at 8:12 am

I make this recipe in my mixer, as seen above, so I don’t have to knead it. But if you don’t have a mixer you will need to knead it well after you add the second batch of flour and before you let it rise. Then after you let it do the second rise ( 1 hour) punch it down and knead it a bit more.

Reply

39 Erin October 4, 2013 at 12:22 pm

basically the same as my basic bread recipe :) Only instead of plain oil I use lard or coconut oil. Makes awesome cinnamon rolls too. It is a great all around recipe. :)

Reply

40 Valerie Monschien Laux October 4, 2013 at 2:24 pm

what kind of mixer is that? Andd where can I get one ? I sure am going to try this bread

Reply

41 Merissa October 4, 2013 at 3:22 pm

It’s a Bosch Mixer. We love it!

Reply

42 moira October 12, 2013 at 8:54 pm

Can I freeze it? I think I would freeze it right before the putting it in the bread pans but just wanted to double check

Reply

43 Merissa October 13, 2013 at 6:53 am

I freeze this after it’s baked. You may be able to freeze it before but I haven’t tried it.

Reply

44 Ashley October 21, 2013 at 8:49 pm

Sooo I just have to letcha know- your site is my new favorite recipe site! :) Thanks for sharing so much yummi-ness!

Reply

45 Merissa October 21, 2013 at 8:50 pm

I’m so glad you are enjoying!

Reply

46 Brenda October 30, 2013 at 6:55 am

Hi, Merissa,
Every time I try my hand at making homemade bread it comes out really dense and yeasty tasting. When I use the bread machine it comes out fantastic, light and yummy!
So I’m going to try this recipe to see if it comes out nicely.
Thank you for sharing this recipe!
Brenda

Reply

47 Merissa October 30, 2013 at 6:58 am

This is a great tasty recipe Brenda, I hope you like it! :)

Reply

48 Paddy November 23, 2013 at 4:54 pm

I made this recipe a number of times with fresh yeast, and it was delicious every time!! But my local stores stopped carrying fresh yeast. Can I make this recipe with active dry yeast instead? Is the measurement the same?

Reply

49 Merissa November 23, 2013 at 8:56 pm

You should be able to and it should be the same.

Reply

50 paddy November 23, 2013 at 10:10 pm

Thanks! I’ll let you know how it turns out!

Reply

51 Linzy February 10, 2014 at 9:55 am

I LOVE LOVE LOVE your blog!!! I have a few silly questions! On the measurements, is the T for tablespoon and the t for teaspoon? Also is the c. for cup? I have been looking for a website like yours for a while and I am soo thankful I found it!! You are a blessing to a young mom of 2 little boys and a preacher’s wife. :) God Bless!

Reply

52 Merissa February 10, 2014 at 9:58 am

Yes, sorry i haven’t changed over my old recipes that I just put abbreviations on :) Capital T = Tablespoon, lowercase t = teaspoon, c = cup.

Reply

53 Amy February 11, 2014 at 6:28 am

I have never been able to make bread that turns out edible. I have made this recipe twice now and it actually turned out AND tasted sooo good!!! Thanks so much for all you do/write/recommend on your sight. I grew up near Walnut Grove and have loved the Little House series since I was very young.

Reply

54 Merissa February 11, 2014 at 6:42 am

Awesome, I’m glad this recipe works for you! I’ve been to Walnut Grove before, it’s a fun little spot!

Reply

55 Linzy February 19, 2014 at 11:58 pm

I just made this yesterday for the first time ever, and it turned out fantastic! My husband, two little boys and I had one loaf gone in no time! Definitely making this from now on. No more buying bread from the store! Thank you so much for everything you do on your site. You really are an inspiration! I will be making the gummies next! Have a BLESSED day. :)

Reply

56 Barbarainnc March 2, 2014 at 3:00 pm

I read all the comments, no one asked what was 1/6 c sugar was equal to? I don’t have a 1/6 of a cup! :) :) :)

I know 1/4 c = 4 T
1/8 c = 2 T

Reply

57 Merissa March 2, 2014 at 3:01 pm

1/6 of a cup would be half of a 1/3 cup.

Reply

58 Barbarainnc March 2, 2014 at 3:12 pm

One conversion site said 1/6 c = to 2T and 2t.

Thanks for the quick reply. :) :)

Reply

59 Jenifer July 11, 2014 at 10:41 am

Active dry yeast.. check, but what kind of flour? Just bread flour, or all purpose? Also, for the cinnamon buns, would I simply just cut the dough into strips and roll them into a cinnamon sugar mixture, then bake and frost?
I am in love with the site! We are moving to our very own “little house in the big woods”(43 acres!) this fall, while we are building our dream home. I will actually be cooking off of an antique wood burning kitchen stove.

Reply

60 Merissa July 11, 2014 at 1:09 pm

I just use all purpose but bread flour works too. Yes, that’s what would do for the rolls, yum! I bet your stove is lovely, I’ve always wanted one of those!

Reply

61 Roberta oswalt September 16, 2014 at 11:35 am

I have a question. When you place the dough in the loaf pans to rise do you grease them first? Would the dough stick to t he pan if you don’t? And don’t you turn the dough over when you grease the pan to cover all over?

Reply

62 Merissa September 16, 2014 at 5:05 pm

Yes, I do grease the pans before I place the dough in them, otherwise it gets quite sticky.

Reply

63 Kim December 15, 2014 at 5:33 pm

After a few failed attempts and different methods… I can’t wait to try this one! One question though, usually you have to knead the dough for a while, so how long do you leave the mixer on?

Reply

64 Merissa December 15, 2014 at 6:22 pm

I don’t that I’ve ever kept track but it’s for several minutes for sure.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Thanks for taking a moment to share your thoughts and your story. I love to hear from you! Please remember this is a supportive and encouraging community. LHL reserves the right to delete any personal attacks, rude or offensive language, or anything not deemed family friendly.

See our Comment Policy for more information.