Sweet & Tasty Apple Pie Jam Canning Recipe

If you’re a fan of sweet, spiced, comforting apple pie (and who’s not?), then there’s no doubt you will fall in love with this apple pie jam recipe just as I did the first time I tried it.

Apple Pie Jam Recipe

Apple Pie Jam (Canning Recipe)

By Contributor Anna Sakawsky of The House and the Homestead

I had honestly never even considered turning apples into a jam until I tried a jar of apple pie jam that I picked up on a camping road trip with my hubby a few years ago.

We stopped at a little roadside diner as we made our way up the highway along the Gold Rush Trail in British Columbia and were pleasantly surprised by both the down-home feel of the rustic, saloon-like diner, the hospitality of the locals and, most impressively, the floor-to-ceiling wall full of home-canned jars of jam. Each jar bore the name “Grandma Bella” on the label, whom I imagined to be the sort of sweet but feisty matriarch who made every batch of jam with love and chased grandkids who snuck tastes with their fingers out of her kitchen with a rolling pin. A little like my own great-grandmother 😉

As I read through the labels, my eyes lit up as I stumbled upon such delicacies as Carrot Cake Jam and Apple Pie Jam, along with the usual berry suspects, and I knew immediately that I had to try some of these more intriguing varieties.

I bought a few jars and took them back to our campsite where I spread them on toast the following morning. Oh. My. Heavens. The apple pie jam was to die for! It tasted exactly like apple pie filling, but instead of waiting until a special occasion for a slice of pie, this jam made it possible to enjoy the taste of apple pie spread over a bagel on any given morning.

The problem was, however, that I only bought one jar of this flavour! What was I thinking? That somehow maybe I wouldn’t like a jam named after one of the world’s tastiest pies?

One day we moved out to the country and I bought myself a canning book and taught myself how to water bath can to ensure nothing went to waste. We made applesauce, apple pie filling, apple cider and -oh yeah- apple pie jam!

I knew as soon as we decided that we were going to preserve a bunch of those apples that I was going to try to replicate Grandma Bella’s apple pie jam. But the only comparable recipe in the canning book that I purchased called for extra ingredients like raisins and citrus peels. I just wanted a straight-up apple pie jam with no frills. So I modified the recipe until I got it as close as possible to that first jar I had enjoyed.

Now, 3 years later, I still make apple pie jam every harvest season and I’ve got my own recipe down to a science. I don’t know that I can say with a clear conscience that it will ever be quite as good as Grandma Bella’s -and I might just be asking for a whack with a rolling pin if I did say such a thing- but I will venture to say that it’s a close second.

Added bonus: This jam makes a great Christmas gift, so we usually make an extra batch to put away as gifts. Not only does this save us time and money come Christmas, but it’s always nice to be able to give a quality homemade gift to loved ones that will actually be used and enjoyed!


Jam on Toast

How to Use Apple Pie Jam

  • Over pancakes or waffles. Skip the syrup and use this jam instead for the ultimate fall pancakes.
  • On toast. This is the perfect spread for toast or for English Muffins.
  • In your oatmeal. This is such a great oatmeal add-in!
  • In a yogurt parfait. You could just top your yogurt with a warm scoopful of this Apple Pie Jam or you could layer it in a parfait with Granola.
  • As an ice cream topping. Yummy!

apples

Ingredients for Apple Pie Jam

  • Apples. A firmer, less sweet apple is best in this recipe like a Honeycrisp or Granny Smith but you can use any apple that you have.
  • Lemon Juice. This will need to be bottled juice to ensure the correct ph levels.
  • Cinnamon.
  • Nutmeg.
  • Ginger.
  • Butter. Optional. This helps the jam from getting too foamy while you are cooking but you can leave it out if you need to.
  • Powdered Pectin. Pamona’s Pectin is my favorite!
  • Sugar. The amount of sugar can be cut down or honey can be subbed if you are using Pamona’s Pectin.
  • Brown Sugar. This really gives it that Apple Pie flavor!

Chopped Apples

Instructions for Making Apple Pie Jam

1. Prepare canner, jars and lids: Fill your canner (or pot with a canning rack in the bottom) with water. Wash jars and bands in hot soapy water and heat in a boiling water bath canner to sterilize. Keep jars warm in the water until ready to fill. Have new canning lids ready to be placed on jars.

FInely Chopped APples

2. Peel, core and chop your apples. I like to peel all of my apples first, then core them all at once and then dice them up fine with my slap-chop, but you can dice them by hand with a knife or in a food processor. * I keep my peeled apples in a bowl with cold water and a tablespoon of lemon juice to prevent my apples from browning too much while I finish processing them all, but if they discolour a bit it’s no big deal as you won’t be able to tell once this jam is complete.

3. Measure out 4 cups of diced apples. As you measure them out, fill the measuring cup (with diced apples in it) with water so that the water just covers the apples. Do this all at once in a 4-cup measuring cup or repeat as necessary if using a smaller measuring cup.

Cooking Apple Pie Jam

4. Dump apples and water into a large, stainless steel pot and add lemon juice, spices and butter. * The butter helps keep the jam from getting too foamy.

5. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring frequently. Then, reduce the heat to medium and boil gently for roughly 8-10 minutes until apples soften.

6. Remove from heat and add pectin. Stir until dissolved. Place pot back on high heat and return to a boil, stirring frequently.

7. Add both sugars at once and return to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Boil hard, stirring constantly, for one minute.

8. Remove from heat and skim off any foam (the addition of the butter greatly reduces foam in this recipe, so you may find there is none to skim off. Yipee!)

Pouring Apple Pie Jam into jars

9. Ladle into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Remove any air bubbles by skimming around the edges of the jar with a knife and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a clean cloth, place lids on jars and screw on bands until fingertip-tight (tight enough that the bands are secure but not so tight that air bubbles can’t escape while in the canner).

Apple Pie Jam in Jars

10. Place jars in the hot water in the canner, ensuring they are completely submerged and bring water to a boil. Once water is boiling, process for 10 minutes, then remove canner lid, wait 5 minutes and remove jars. Allow to cool at room temperature and try not to disturb the jars for roughly 12 hours. Store in a cool dark place to maximize shelf life. *Stores for up to a minimum of one year, but easily much longer.

Apple Pie Jam

Make sure you check out all the free Canning and Preserving Recipes we have on Little House Living!

We recommend a Presto Pressure Canner and the book Putting Food By for all your canning projects.


 

FAQs About Apple Pie Jam

What kind of apples are best for jam?

Firmer, more tart apples are best for jam because they will produce the best flavor. Choose Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Pink Lady, or similar apples for you jam recipes.

What is the difference between apple butter and apple jam?

Apple Jam has pieces of apples in it and it’s a firmer texture. Apple Butter is smooth and creamy.

How long is apple jam good for?

Like most canned goods, it could potentially last indefinitely if properly canned, although I try and store my canned goods no longer than 2-3 years because the quality will go down. Opened Apple Jam in the fridge will last for several weeks until you notice mold or an off smell.


Apple Pie Jam Recipe

This Apple Pie Jam is perfect for using apples when they are in season. It also makes a wonderful gift.

Course Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword Apple Pie Jam, Canning Recipe, Jam Recipe
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 6 jelly jars
Calories 732 kcal
Creator Anna

Ingredients

  • 4 cups apples peeled, cored and finely diced
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon butter optional
  • 1 box powdered pectin
  • 4 cups white sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar

Instructions

  1. Prepare canner, jars and lids: Fill your canner (or pot with a canning rack in the bottom) with water. Wash jars and bands in hot soapy water and heat in a boiling water bath canner to sterilize. Keep jars warm in the water until ready to fill. Have new canning lids ready to be placed on jars.

  2. Peel, core and chop your apples. I like to peel all of my apples first, then core them all at once and then dice them up fine with my slap-chop, but you can dice them by hand with a knife or in a food processor. 

  3. Measure out 4 cups of diced apples. As you measure them out, fill the measuring cup (with diced apples in it) with water so that the water just covers the apples. Do this all at once in a 4-cup measuring cup or repeat as necessary if using a smaller measuring cup.

  4.  Dump apples and water into a large, stainless steel pot and add lemon juice, spices and butter.

  5. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring frequently. Then, reduce the heat to medium and boil gently for roughly 8-10 minutes until apples soften.

  6. Remove from heat and add pectin. Stir until dissolved. Place pot back on high heat and return to a boil, stirring frequently.

  7. Add both sugars at once and return to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Boil hard, stirring constantly, for one minute.

  8. Remove from heat and skim off any foam.

  9. Ladle into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Remove any air bubbles by skimming around the edges of the jar with a knife and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a clean cloth, place lids on jars and screw on bands until fingertip-tight.

  10. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely submerged and bring water to a boil. Once water is boiling, process for 10 minutes, then remove canner lid, wait 5 minutes and remove jars. Allow to cool at room temperature and try not to disturb the jars for roughly 12 hours. Store in a cool dark place to maximize shelf life. 

Nutrition Facts
Apple Pie Jam Recipe
Amount Per Serving
Calories 732 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 0.5g3%
Trans Fat 0.03g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.2g
Cholesterol 2mg1%
Sodium 35mg2%
Potassium 149mg4%
Carbohydrates 189g63%
Fiber 3g13%
Sugar 177g197%
Protein 0.3g1%
Vitamin A 68IU1%
Vitamin C 6mg7%
Calcium 43mg4%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

More Canning Recipes:

Anna

 

My name is Anna and I’m a modern homesteader blogging at The House and the Homestead. I began homesteading a few years ago and it changed my life! I am passionate about growing and preserving food, making as much
as I can with my own two hands, and living a more frugal,
sustainable and self-sufficient life. I love to help and inspire others
to do the same & prove that the simple life doesn’t have to be
complicated!

 

This recipe for Apple Pie Jam was originally posted on Little House Living in June 2018. It has been updated as of September 2022.

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19 Comments

    1. Did you mean the rims? If so, yes the lids and the rims stay on the jars while they are cooling. Don’t remove the rims until the jars have fully cooled (I’d leave them at least a day or two), and then you can remove before pantry storage.

  1. I have several varieties of apples on my “edible landscape” here in northern Wisconsin. I can hardly wait for the apple season so I can try this recipe with various varieties of my homegrown apples. Anna, thank you SO much for this recipe! It’s exactly the type of thing I signed onto this site for.

  2. Hi Merissa.

    Can you tell me if this recipe requires a pressure canner or can I just use a water bath canner?

  3. Right now I’m in the middle of making strawberry jam, my younger son and I picked 12 baskets worth this morning at a near by pick your own place. But does this use the regular pectin like Certo or the reduced sugar kind?? I use the Certo Light for my jams here and we love it. Six cups of fruit to only 4-1/2 cups sugar.

  4. This looks so good! I am definitely going to use this recipe this fall when the local apples are ripe! Thank you!

  5. Sounds similar to apple butter, a few differences. We really like apples in different ways, and this sounds yummy. Thanks for sharing your recipe with all of us . Have a great day. Sincerely, Mommy of two growing blessings & so much more!

  6. I am going to try this recipe. It sounds great. I am old-school and so is my mother. We both had to take home ec classes in school. We were taught that teaspoon is written in lower case, such as tsp. Tablespoon should be capitalized. Whenever I read any online recipe I notice that this is out of fashion. When I jot down recipes for myself I still use T or tsp.