My Granny’s Peach Kuchen Recipe

Growing up, Traditional German Kuchen was served at every family get together. This Peach Kuchen Recipe was one of my favorites, learn how to make it from scratch just like Granny did.

Growing up, Traditional German Kuchen was served at every family get together. This Peach Kuchen Recipe was one of my favorites, learn how to make it from scratch just like Granny did. #traditionalgermanrecipe #peachkuchen #kuchenrecipe #recipesfromscratch

Peach Kuchen Recipe

When I was a little girl, we’d gather either in my grandparent’s backyard or in a picnic-style set up in the garage for every major holiday. We enjoyed the family’s company and a chance to catch up with each other’s lives. The eating would start after everyone had arrived and soon after, everyone would scatter to a different table to make sure they got to talk to everyone.  Eventually, a back-rubbing line would start on one of the benches of the picnic tables.

Each get-together would always end with a thick piece of Granny’s kuchen. She usually made a few different kinds so there was enough to go around and we could try new flavors than what she made for the previous holiday.

In our German family, kuchen was always a staple, but no one made it as Granny did. In fact, no one even tried. Many years before my Granny passed away, I remember starting to ask her if I could have the recipe. Like most of the best bakers, she would always tell me she didn’t measure; it was just all in her head.

Eventually, we got her to write down some version of her traditional german kuchen recipe but it wasn’t the same. So with my baking skills (that must have been passed down from her!), I edited the recipe I was given to try and come as close to her real recipe as possible. Her crust was always quite thick with very little room for filling. I always thought one of the best flavors was her peach kuchen recipe because peaches always taste fresh in a german kuchen recipe, even when you use home canned peaches like I do. (But feel free to use fresh peaches if you have them!)

–Granny’s recipes are my favorites, like this Pumpkin Pie in a Jar

peach kuchen recipe

Peach Kuchen Recipe

What You Need:

  • 2 ¼ cups white flour
  • ¼ cup shortening
  • ¼ cup + 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 2 eggs + 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup cream
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 cups sliced or chopped peaches

How to make peach kuchen:

In a small bowl, mix together the yeast, water, and a teaspoon of sugar. Set aside.

In a large bowl, mix together the flour, shortening, sugar, and 2 whole eggs. Mix together until crumbly.

Add in the yeast mixture. You may need to add a little milk to make a nice sticky dough. Knead the dough for several minutes. Place it in a warm area and cover it to let it rise for about an hour.

peach kuchen recipe

Grease a 9×9 (or slightly larger) pan. Pat the dough into the bottom of the pan and slightly up the sides. Place in a pre-heated to 350 degree oven and bake for 15 minutes.

During this time, in a medium bowl, mix together the cream, cinnamon, and egg yolks.

–Freeze leftover cream with these Cream Cubes.

After you take the bread out of the oven, place the chopped peaches in the middle and pour the cream mixture over the top. Place back in the oven and bake for another 30-40 minutes or until the middle has set up. Enjoy warm or cold.

peach kuchen recipe

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Peach Kuchen Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 ¼ cups white flour
  • ¼ cup shortening
  • ¼ cup + 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 2 eggs + 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup cream
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 cups sliced or chopped peaches

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl, mix together the yeast, water, and a teaspoon of sugar. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, shortening, sugar, and 2 whole eggs. Mix together until crumbly.
  3. Add in the yeast mixture. (You may need to add a little milk to make a nice sticky dough). Knead the dough for several minutes.
  4. Place it in a warm area and cover to let it rise for about an hour.
  5. Grease a 9x9 (or slightly larger pan.)

  6. Pat the dough into the bottom of the pan and slightly up the sides.
  7. Place in a pre-heated to 350 degree oven and bake for 15 minutes.
  8. During this time, in a medium bowl, mix together the cream, cinnamon, and egg yolks.
  9. After you take the bread out of the oven, place the chopped peaches in the middle and pour the cream mixture over the top.
  10. Place back in the oven and bake for another 30-40 minutes or until the middle has set up.
  11. Enjoy warm or cold.

Looking for more delicious peach recipes? Give these a try:

Simple Peach Cobbler Muffins Recipe

Homemade Peach Cantaloupe Butter Canning Recipe

Simple Homemade Peach Cobbler

Canning Peaches

Peach Cheesecake Cobbler

Have you ever had kuchen before? Do you think you will try this Peach Kuchen Recipe?

merissabio

This Peach Kuchen Recipe was originally published in September 2013. It has been updated as of September 2019.

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36 Comments

  1. This sounds like a great recipe! Have you (or your Gran) made it with apples? With my abundance of apples right now I’m wondering how they would work in this.

  2. Can you sub butter for the shortening? Or possibly coconut oil? I know it would change the flavor a bit, but thats all I have at the moment and have some fresh peaches that need to be gobbled up!

        1. Great! Please let us know what you end up using and how it works out 🙂 I actually used palm shortening when I made this recipe so I’m thinking anything else will work just fine because the shortening I used was very soft.

  3. I used organic butter in the place of shortening and it worked just fine!!! I also had a few raspberries that I needed to use up so I threw them in with the peaches. So good!! Thank you for the recipe! Good thing I have yoga tonight, because I cannot stop eating this!!! 🙂

  4. Would this be able to be converted ti gluten free? Do you, (or anyone else), know how to conver the the flour over? And what o convert it to? (product wise?). I bake gluten free al the time, but the recipes I use are always start out g.f. I am just learning how to convert thngs.. Thank you!!

    1. I presonally don’t think this recipe would work gf. I’ve never experimented with gf flours and yeast so maybe someone else who has will comment with some advice 🙂

  5. Your instructions don’t say when to add the yeast mixture. I’m assuming it’s before you kneed the dough, as you will need yeast to make it rise. I just want to make sure, because I’ve never worked with yeast before. Thanks :).

  6. My husband’s family is German and this looks a lot like what has often been served. I’ve never seen the name in writing but I’m wondering if it is the same. I always thought they were saying ‘dinna koogen’. Do you think this could be the same with just my horrible understanding of the name? This looks delicious and I’m going to make it for my husband and maybe be even surprise the family with some on Christmas! Thanks for sharing your recipe!

  7. I married my German husband in 1965. His mother made the most fantastic Kuchens…She also never measured a single thing…And she could never teach any of us 5 daughter in laws her wonderful recipes…She would just say oh let me do it…I have been looking for a yeast Kuchen for years…Usually I just find heavy cake type recipes that don’t even come close to her fantastic desserts…I am so excited to try this…I was married to the youngest son so there are only a few of us left to enjoy this if it comes out as good as hers…I will be looking forward to reading your posts and if you send out email messages I really want on your list..Thank you and Happy Holidays…

  8. My great aunt always made Kuchen, usually apple I think but I don’t think she made a yeast version. I could be wrong since I never asked for the recipe but I would love to try it gluten free. I have made gluten free bread with yeast so I think I might try to Pamala’s baking mix (I have a bunch on hand) and I have a ton of green apples so that might work as soon as I have time which is not right now. I’ll let you know if the Pamala’s worked.

  9. My (German) mother also rarely measured when she baked. Most of it was done be the “feel” of the dough or batter. No one baked like her. She learned from her mother and grandmother. Thanks for sharing your version of your granny’s recipe. I bet every bite reminds you of her and brings back great childhood memories!

  10. Followed recipe to a T…..ended up making a bread loaf unsuitable to add fruit and cream mixture. Not the kuchen as I’m accustomed to, here in Linton, ND.

  11. I love the recipe my grandmother was born in Sioux Falls, SD and uses a similar she is a Kaufman… maybe the name sounds familiar?

  12. A lovely recipe – reminds me of my gran’s baking. She often made plum cakes and fruit cakes very similar to this all the time. A real taste of home. Bonjour via Friendship Friday. Look forward to saying hello 🙂

  13. I am going to ask my German brotherinlaw about Kuchen. Sounds delicious and I love the connection with your grandmother. Pinned. Thanks for bringing this to Weekend Bites. We will be live tonight 8:30 EST. Happy Thanksgiving.

  14. My remember eating the Kuchen my great grandmother used to make when I was a child. My favorites were peach and plum. I never got her recipe and have been looking for one that will be close to hers. This sounds like it will be very close. Thank you for posting it and I will be trying this one for sure.

  15. Ever since hubby and me moved to Germany: I have been treated to all kinds of kuchen by every kind of gathering of a few people; and then not one sort but at least 4 or in church 20 sorts or more. I Holland we usually buy a cake(a round formed one) although recently baking has become a trend again. I am not a baker except for making quiche for dinner but hubby has now learned how to make kuchen to the appreciation of his male colleges at work. I showed the recipie to hubby; he thinks it looks yummy and will try it out 🙂

  16. 2 stars
    Made this in 9×9 pan as directed. The dough (more like batter) was very loose and I was not able to get it to go up the sides of the pan. Definitely needs a larger pan. After 55 minutes the center is still liquid and I baked at 375. Sorry I wasted the ingredients and will be throwing this away. Was very hopeful about this recipe as I’ve searched for years for a kuchen recipe with a yeast dough. Wonder if anyone else had the same problem?

    1. Sorry you had trouble. We’ve made this recipe for decades and it’s worked well for us. It was originally for a kuchen pan so it’s not going to go all the way the sides of a traditional deep dish 9×9 pan.