Chicken Broth Gravy

One thing we make around here a lot is chicken. We are primarily chicken and beef eaters since I’m allergic to pork and organic/natural turkey is harder to come by.

Chicken Broth Gravy

Chicken Broth Gravy

Back on track…we eat a lot of chicken. My favorite way to cook chicken is in the crockpot. I like to buy whole chickens in bulk from our local Hutterite colony and so it’s easy for me just to stick one straight from the freezer into the crockpot and have a warm meal at the end of the day.

One of our favorite meals out of this chicken in the crockpot is a simple one with mashed potatoes, gravy, and of course..chicken.

Chicken broth gravy is easy enough to make and takes only 3 ingredients. It makes a great addition to the meal to pour over potatoes, chicken, or even a special side of stuffing. Since it takes about 5 minutes (or less!) to make it’s worth your time! Another thing we love about this is that since it’s made from nourishing bone broth it’s very healthy for you!

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Chicken Broth Gravy

What You Need:

  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 Tablespoon of starch (I use potato starch, corn starch or arrowroot is fine!)
  • Garlic Powder
  • Onion Powder
  • salt to taste

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In a saucepan, pour in the chicken broth. Turn on a medium heat and let it start to simmer and bubble. Add in the garlic, salt, and onion powder. How much you add will be up to your tastes. For this amount of broth, we usually do about 1/2 teaspoon of each.

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In a small bowl, mix a tiny amount of COLD water with your tablespoon of starch until it’s combined.

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Add the water/starch mixture into the chicken broth on the stove, stirring with a whisk while you add.

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Let the mixture simmer for a few more moments while you stir. The gravy will thicken and set up. Add in salt to taste.

And that’s all there is to making Chicken Broth Gravy! As I mentioned above…use for a topping for all kinds of dishes. Store in the fridge if you have leftovers. The mixture will thicken even more into a gel like substance but all you have to do to make it “normal” again is heat it up, either on the stove or in the microwave. Enjoy!

Need some other ideas on what to make with your chicken from a crockpot? You can also learn to start Drying Homemade Chicken Broth or even start Canning Chicken!

merissabio

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12 Comments

  1. My Uncle, who is a wonderful cook, taught me to whisk the starch into the cold or room temperature broth and then bring it to a boil while stirring. I really did not believe him until I tried it but it makes the most wonderful, smooth gravy I have ever eaten and I always do it that way now.

  2. We always used corn starch for thickening gravies at home, but now I use flour because it seems to have a thicker finish. The one nice thing about using starch is you can whisk it into your gravy (mixed w/little water) while the gravy or broth is still hot with no worries about lumps. With flour you run the risk of lumps unless you mix it first into the drippings or cold broth. Both are delicious end results!

  3. This recipe for gravy couldnt possibly produce what most people would call gravy. It would be extremely thin, and you couldn’t use the same technique called for here if using regular flour. The basic rule of thumb for thickening any liquid (milk, broth, fruit juice) is 2 tbsp thickener (cornstarch, flours) per one cup liquid. For 2 cups liquid, you would need 4 tbsp thickener. You could get by with three if you like thin gravy. I recommend using the full amount of thickener and then thinning the gravy to the desired thickness after you see what it’s like when it’s done. If using wheat flour, always make a roux first by melting 1 tbsp butter or meat fat for every tbsp of flour and bubbling together in pan while stirring for 15 seconds before adding liquid and whisking to blend well. If using cornstarch, mix cornstarch with any cold liquid before heating. Then season chicken gravy to taste with a tiny bit of poultry seasoning or rosemary, salt and pepper. For chicken broth that doesn’t have much flavor, try adding Kitchen Bouquet.

  4. Tisha, just because you do things differently is no reason to act so superior. If the ingredients made gravy for her, then let it be. Geez…some people are just hateful!

    1. I agree with Sadie. I just finished making this gravy and found I had to add a little more broth because it was so thick. I would tell Tasha to try it first and then comment on it. This is not playing nice. Let it be. We’re not doing Cordon Bleu cooking here.

  5. I read your recipe with interest because I am trying to cut back on some things that add to my daily health plan. For the record I have just had a total knee replacement and had a difficult time. They found by accident that I have pulmonary hypertension and am now doing cardiac and pulmonary workups. My generation made thick fat laden gravy of almost every meal. Chicken beef, paprakash, noodles rice you name it. Heavy, fat , filling and cheap was the rule of for families that lived near or around a world war or depression. That life style takes its toll on you when you are 70. Your previous writer was correct in her directions for the kind of gravy that we all made back when. We also added sugar to corn, brown sugar to squash and sweet potatoes and ate foods heavily coated in presertavives and artificial flavoring.. We used chemical “butter” called margarine instead of organic grain feed milk made butter. Why am I writing this. Because I am glad that your generation is trying to correct the mistakes of the past.
    I made your gravy from the juices of my instant pot chicken, Found it flavorful tasting like CHICKEN and was perfect with mashed potatoes and real butter.
    I have unsubscribed from many other blogs as it takes too much time to wade through all of the email but yours is the one I look foreward to. You are the bright new generation that proves to us oldsters that there is hope for the future of our grandchildren and great grandchildren.

    You keep on doing what you do, ignore the naysayers, there is always one that thinks they know everthing. I only wish I knew you personally, you would be a great friend. Sincerely Aurelie Higgins

    1. Aurelie, I agree completely. My grandmother made everything with bacon grease or lard. Yes it was tasty, but oh the sodium and calories. My use of chicken stock has changed as well. Almost every recipe I look up says low sodium stock. For over 10 years I’ve used no salt stock as I choose the amount of salt I add. You sometimes have to adjust a recipe calling for a can of tomates, can of beans, etc. So with salt. ICK

  6. I would like to reply to the earlier comment. As a FACS Teacher I would like to remind you that the formula for Classic Bechamel or White Sauce is 1 tbs butter, i tbs flour and 1 cup of milk. There is no need for any other thickener except time/patience.

  7. Aurelie, I agree completely. My grandmother made everything with bacon grease or lard. Yes it was tasty, but oh the sodium and calories. My use of chicken stock has changed as well. Almost every recipe I look up says low sodium stock. For over 10 years I’ve used no salt stock as I choose the amount of salt I add. You sometimes have to adjust a recipe calling for a can of tomates, can of beans, etc. So with salt. ICK